Author Solutions, authors, book marketing, book selling, helpful hints, Indie book publishing, self publishing, writing

4 Reasons Why Attending a Writer’s Conference Is a Really Good Idea

GLAWS presentationOver the past few years, I have had the opportunity and privilege to attend and speak at writer’s conferences in the US and abroad. I find it to be one of the more enjoyable activities I perform as part of my duties.  I think if you are in the midst of a manuscript, or trying to understand what it means to be an author today, attending a well-run writer’s conference can be a good investment of time and money.

It can be overwhelming, but worth it.

If you have never been to a conference, or if you are new to the publishing world, or if you have been previously published through a traditional publisher, attending a writer’s conference can prove very helpful for a number of reasons.

You will be inspired and encouraged by like-minded people.

Writing a book can be a lonely process. Many times, it is you and your notepad and keypad, working through the excitement and doubts of finishing a manuscript. While in most cases, you can find support with friends and family, it is not the same as sharing the experience with someone who knows the joys and struggles of writing a book. But at writer’s conferences, you will find people who know exactly what you are going through. They can provide tips and suggestions. In fact I am always amazed at the relationships, connections and even friendships that can be built in a weekend at a conference.

You will learn about all the options you have as an author.

Speaking at GLAWS

Always enjoy the Q&A at conferences. Spoke recently at the West Coast Writer’s conference. 

It is the best time in history, but it is also the most confusing time to be an author because you have more choice and opportunity than ever before. So it is important you have a clear understanding of what options you have and what publishing path is the best one for you to pursue for your book or project. That’s why it is important to check the keynote and breakout sessions for the conference. If they are only focused on one area of publishing, such as agents, I think that is less optimal.  Look for a schedule that includes a variety of perspectives and experiences. I think that is most beneficial.

You will hear tips on how to improve your skill as a writer.

Writing is a craft and it is work. So it is important to learn from those who have experience and success. As with any skill, you can learn from others and they can help you get better at what you do. For example, one of the best tips I ever heard at a writer’s conference was a successful author shared that she took acting classes. Not because she ever wanted to become an actress, but because she thought doing that would help her write better dialogue in her books. I thought that was brilliant when I heard it and showed what type of commitment it takes to improve your skill.

You will develop a better understanding of marketing.

Most first time authors do not always understand what part they will have to play in marketing their book. In fact for many authors, marketing is a mystery. I personally enjoy speaking about marketing to authors so they can better understand what they need to do to build a platform and a following for their book. Good conferences will include a variety of workshops on marketing so look for those in the schedule in the mean time, I have written a whitepaper titled, The 3 Phases of an Effective Book Marketing Campaign that many authors have found helpful.

So which conference should you attend?

Over the years I have had the opportunity to attend and speak at a number of conferences. I am sure there are more than what I have listed and linked to below, but I can say each of these offers writers  a great opportunity to improve their craft, make some great connections and be inspired to get to their goal. If you plan to attend one of these let me know. I have already committed to speak at some of them and look forward to meeting you in person.

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authors, Editing, helpful hints, Indie book publishing, self publishing, writing

LET’S EAT GRANDMA: The Importance of Proofreading

kathyideOne of the things I enjoy most about my current role is the opportunity to meet and interact with some amazingly creative and professional people. A few weeks ago when I gave the key note address at the West Coast Writers Conference Indie Author Conference, I had the opportunity to meet Kathy Ide.  Kathy is a published author/ghostwriter, editor/mentor, and writers’ conference speaker.  Her latest book is Proofreading Secrets of Best-Selling Authors is a must read for every aspiring authorShe is also the founder and coordinator of The Christian PEN: Proofreaders and Editors Network (www.TheChristianPEN.com) and the Christian Editor Connection (www.ChristianEditor.com).  

I asked her to share some of her wisdom and experience with my readers through a blog post. Her post is what follows and I think you will find it to be very helpful.

 

LET’S EAT GRANDMA: The Importance of Proofreading

Have you seen the plaques and T-shirts that say:

Let’s Eat Grandma.

Let’s Eat, Grandma.

                        Commas Save Lives.

I love that! It shows how one tiny bit of punctuation can change the entire meaning and tone of a sentence.

You may think that as long as you’ve got life-changing content in your nonfiction manuscript, or an intriguing story with lots of conflict and interesting characters in your fiction manuscript, that should be enough. And yes, content and story are extremely important. But no matter how good those things are, you’ll be running some pretty big risks if you don’t bother proofreading your manuscript carefully for typos, inaccuracies, and inconsistencies … and learning the industry-standard rules regarding punctuation, usage, grammar, and spelling.

OK, you won’t be putting your grandmother’s life on the line or joining a tribe of cannibals. But tiny mistakes in your writing can have disastrous consequences. Here are my top ten:

 

  1. Mechanical errors can decrease your chance of acceptance by a traditional publisher.
  1. Mechanical errors can cause miscommunication.
  1. Mechanical errors can cause confusion.
  1. Mechanical errors can give an unprofessional appearance to publishers and readers.
  1. Mechanical errors can be embarrassing.
  1. Mechanical errors may cause readers to take you and your message less seriously.
  1. Mechanical errors can affect the sales of your book.
  1. Mechanical errors could cost you money.
  1. Mechanical errors can be distracting
  2. Mechanical errors can give you a poor reputation.

 

Professionalism Is Key

Proofreading Secrets_FrontCoverIf you’re writing just for family and friends, it may not matter so much whether every comma is in exactly the right place or if you have a few typos here and there. But if you want to get your book published in today’s highly competitive commercial market, you need every edge you can get. If you expect people to buy what you write, you need to take the time to do it right.

If you have a hard time finding typos, inconsistencies, and “PUGS” errors in your writing, consider hiring a professional proofreader. If you go to http://www.ChristianEditor.com and fill out the form for Authors Seeking Editors, you’ll be connected with established, professional editors who can make your manuscript shine.

A comma may not save Grandma’s life. But a careful proofread might make a life-or-death difference for your manuscript.

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Author Solutions, authors, book marketing, Indie book publishing, Publishing, self publishing

7 simple things you can do to build awareness for your self published book

This past weekend I gave the evening keynote at the West Coast Writer’s Conference Indie Publishing Conference.  I always enjoy those times, because along with meeting many aspiring authors and sharing the 4 Paths to Publishing with them, I also have opportunity to learn myself. At lunch on Saturday, Bill Van Orsdel from Bookfuel, gave a really insightful presentation on book marketing.  Inspired by his talk, I wanted to share some simple things you can do to build awareness for your book before and after your title goes live.

  1. Communicate your milestones–It sounds simple, but every time you reach a milestone such as completing a draft or submitting your manuscript or holding a book signing, let your followers and fans know. It may not seem like much, but it will help you keep people engaged and anticipate what’s next with your book.
  2. Create an engagement contest–This is where you offer different potential titles or book covers and ask your community to weigh in on which they like best. This obviously is a pre-launch activity, but it can be a great way to build a base of potential book buyers.  This also assumes you have a blog where you can post options and let them vote through a poll or in the comment section.

    If possible test different prices to see if you can build demand for your book.

  3. Experiment with the price of your book or books–There has been a lot written about pricing e-books to gain readers and certainly that is worth trying, but you want to be sure you have a clear strategy and goal. You may even want to test giving it away for a short period of time or use one of the sites out there that can facilitate that for you. I also think it is worth experimenting with your print books as well.  I spoke at a conference a few months ago and had both of my print books there. I suggest retail was $10 each but you could buy both for $15. I sold more books at that event than any other.
  4. Offer a giveaway if you can–you may be able to facilitate this through your own website or blog or use a site like Goodreads, but this can be an effective way to help build your mailing list. Use social media to also promote it, but be sure you are clear on where you will deliver books to winners. On Goodreads, you can limit to the US, which may be a good idea if you want to limit your postage cost.
  5. Consider running a PPC campaign–PPC stands for pay-per-click and is the type of campaigns you run online through Google. This probably only makes sense if you have a non-fiction book with a specific topic that people would search for such as autism or financial planning. If you consider this as a marketing option, make sure you understand how this works and you set daily limits on your spend. I have seen people spend more money than they expected because they did not set up their
    Using trending hashtags can be away to tie your book to current events.

    Using trending hashtags can be away to tie your book to current events.

    accounts properly.

  6. Pursue events where you can promote your book–Seems rather obvious to make this statement, but it is worth noting, you have to find places to promote your book. They will not find you. Bookstores and libraries are the most obvious places to start, but get creative. Think about what other places might have a connection or interest in your book. I know authors who have done events at restaurants, hair salons and churches.
  7. Use trending #hashtags–Bill made this point in his presentation and I thought it was a great idea. For example if there is a comet that is approaching the earth and you have a science fiction book that involves a comet use that in tweets about your book. The key is pay attention to what is trending and create an authentic connection to the hashtag and your book. This is certainly more opportunistic than planned, but I suspect in the right situation, it would yield some great results.

I trust you found this list helpful. Are there other things you are doing to build awareness for you book? Share those in the comment section and I will post.

 

 

 

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