Author Solutions, authors, creativity, helpful hints, self publishing, writing

Writing advice –“First you buy a wood burning stove.”

A few weeks ago my wife and I paid a visit to an Amish craftsman who is known for building unique dining room tables. We have always wanted one of his tables since we first enjoyed a dinner around one of his masterpieces a number of years ago. However, he does not have a web site or even email so if you want to order one, you have to schedule an appointment and pay him and his bride of nearly 60 years a visit.

It is more than a two-hour drive from our home, but it was well worth the trip. When w we arrived,  I was surprised to learn he was 80 years old and is still building tables and clearly enjoys it.  He explained that by saying, “I would rather wear out than rust out”. Our conversation also caused me to see writers could learn from him.

I confess I love spending time with craftsman of all types.  I mean people who are really good at what they do and are clearly passionate about it. So when I have a chance to spend time with people like that, I take advantage of the opportunity to learn what they do to be so good and what keeps them motivated.

Writers can learn from wood working

Wood burning stove

Who knew a visit to an Amish craftsman would inspire a blog post to help you in your writing journey

Once we went through the details of ordering the table, I asked him a few questions to see what I might learn from him. The first thing that became clear is writing is a lot like wood working. It is a craft that requires practice and you will make mistakes, but that’s OK.

In fact, when I asked the table maker what he would he tell someone he was training, he quickly said, “buy a wood burning stove so you have somewhere to put your mistakes”. Writers can learn from that. You must work at it, but sometimes you will write something and realize it is not that good.  That is OK and is actually part of the process. However for some of us that feels like failure. Instead you should you look at it as a learning opportunity.  What did you not like about the current version that you would do differently with your next draft?

It is a craft that requires practice and you will make mistakes, but that’s OK.

Sometimes you can see it and admit it to yourself or sometimes it requires an editor to show you the rough edges. Either way, you may have to throw it in the “wood burning stove”, learn from the mistakes and get back to writing a better draft.

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Author Solutions, authors, book selling, Editing, Indie book publishing, Publishing, self publishing, writing

The 4 Paths to Publishing: Understanding your options for getting your book into the hands of readers.

Authors today have more ways to get published than ever before, and while that is exciting news, it can also be the source of much confusion. In fact, many authors are overwhelmed with the seemingly endless menu of options for publishing.   They are also not sure which is the best way to get their book to market.  To clarify the options that exist today and help authors make a discerning decision about their publishing choice, I wrote a white paper called, The Four Paths to Publishing. 

Here is an excerpt that lays out the premise for the paper.

The past four years have brought about more upheaval in the publishing industry than the previous 400 years combined. From the time Gutenberg invented the printing press until the introduction of the paperback about 70 years ago, there weren’t many groundbreaking innovations. However, in the last few years, the publishing world has undergone an indie revolution similar to what occurred in the film and music industries.

With the introduction of desktop publishing, print-on-demand technology, and the Internet as a direct-to-consumer distribution channel, publishing became a service consumers could purchase, instead of an industry solely dependent on middlemen (agents) and buyers (traditional publishers). In addition, the exponential growth of e-books and digital readers has accelerated change, because physical stores are no longer the only way for authors to connect with readers.

While these changes have made now the best time in history to be an author, they have also made it one of the most confusing times to be an author. Not that long ago, there was only one way to get published: find an agent; hope he or she would represent you; pray they sell your book proposal to a publisher; trust the publisher to get behind the book and believe in the project; and hope that readers would go to their local bookstore and buy your book. This description of traditional publishing (or what some now call legacy publishing) is still a viable path for authors today, but now there are three other distinct paths an author can pursue to get published: DIY, General Contractor, and Publishing Package. Each of these could be appropriately labeled as self publishing, but each offers distinct advantages.

It is available to download for free on the Author Solutions web site or by clicking here.  Use the comment section to let me know what you think. Do you agree with my assessment of the industry? Do you find the identification of the four paths helpful? I look forward to hearing your thoughts about the paper.

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authors, Editing, helpful hints, Indie book publishing, Publishing, self publishing, writing

Ten mistakes a reader never misses: Imprecise punctuation (Part 6)

It’s not just about what you say but how you say it.  Punctuation defines your voice—your unique way of speaking to your reader. Which punctuation mark should you choose? Which one communicates the sentence to the reader the way you heard it in your head when you wrote it? Which one reflects your personal style and voice? A good editor should  polish your punctuation to reflect your voice. No matter your subject matter or whether your book is scholarly or casual, precise punctuation throughout your book breathes life into your words and whispers in the reader’s ear, “Wow, this author really knows how to communicate exactly what they want to say.”. Good punctuation can bring emphasis to the right word or words and used properly, it can create a rhythm to the writing that takes the reader on a pleasant ride.

So which of these sentences uses the correct punctuation?

It was his best book , written with the greatest care.

It was his best book ; written with the greatest care.

It was his best book : written with the greatest care.

It was his best book — written with the greatest care

It was his best book written with the greatest care.

In different contexts any of these could be preferable. It depends on what you want to say and where you want the emphasis. They all “sound” different if read out loud  Th e comma, colon, and dash are the most likely candidates, but even among them, the choice becomes a matter of the way you express yourself. Your editor should “listen” for your voice in the text  and then adjusts the punctuation to you, your voice, and your story. That’s why having a competent editor look at manuscript can only make it better.

….precise punctuation throughout your book breathes life into your words

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