agents, Author Solutions, authors, book marketing, book selling, Publishing, self publishing, writing

The Author Learning Center may be the best resource for aspiring authors to learn from experts

You can find just about everything you need to know at the Author Learning Center.

You can find just about everything you need to know at the Author Learning Center.

It hasn’t been around as some of the other resources aspiring authors can turn to to improve their craft and learn the business, but if you haven’t looked at the Author Learning Center, recently,  you should. Quietly, the Author Learning Center has been amassing the most amazing collection of educational information for writers and authors to help navigate the new world of publishing.

Writing, Publishing and Marketing, Oh My!

On this site, you can find a wide variety of authors, agents and professional service providers sharing their insights, opinions, and expertise on writing, publishing and marketing books. Even better, most of this content is available in video, article and podcast formats. Plus, there is a regular schedule of helpful webinars available.

Some of the most popular content includes:

  • How Do You Build a Social Media Platform From Scratch?
  • How Do You Grab A Reader’s Attention?
  • 3 Steps to Make Social Media Sell Your Books
  • What an Agent Really Wants From an Unpublished Author
  • When to Begin Promoting

A Book Launch Tool to Help You Get to Your Goal

ALC Book Launch ToolIn addition to the great content, the Author Learning Center offers a Book Launch Tool and Author Circle tool to help aspiring authors create a plan and accountability on their publishing journey. It is a subscription model and it is managed by Author Solutions, who sponsors this blog, but if you subscribe for the year and eventually publish with an ASI imprint in a year, you will get your money back in a discount on your publishing package.

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Author Solutions, authors, book marketing, Indie book publishing, iuniverse, Publishing, self publishing

Self published author and speaker, Terry Hawkins, gets publishing deal with traditional publisher.

For some time, I have been saying this is the best time in history to be an author because there is more than one path to publishing and more than one way for an author to get picked up by a traditional publisher. Terry Hawkins is another great example of how self publishing can lead to even bigger opportunities.

Terry founded a professional training company, People in Progress Global, in 1989. Since then, educating businesses and individuals has been her passion, and along the way she has helped more than 300,000 professionals find their drive and realize their goals. She is a native of Australia so before her relocation to the USA she was one of the most sought-after, award winning female speaker down under.

Choosing iUniverse as her self publishing services company

Because of her busy speaking schedule she used the publishing package path to get her book “Why Wait to be Great?” self published through iUniverse. In the video below she explains how iUniverse took a good book and made it great.  Once in the market, the book gained the attention of Barrett-Koehler, which is a respected publisher who  welcomes authors who share in its mission of “Creating a World That Works for All.” 

Publishing her book is one way she hopes to encourage people

In the press release announcing the acquisition, Terry made this comment,  “It’s been my life’s work to help people achieve their goals and experience success both personally and professionally,” said Hawkins. “With the help of Barrett-Koehler and iUniverse, the methods and teachings I’ve used in my own life to overcome great adversity and throughout my career, are now available to everyone in ‘Why Wait to be Great,’ and I hope it encourages others to deal with their pain and follow their dreams just as I have with my own.”

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authors, Indie book publishing, Publishing, self publishing, writing

What is the most important thing for non-fiction authors: Write with clarity.

I think it is a daunting task to write a book on how to write well, yet there are volumes of such books published each year. Few become classics, like The Elements of Style, but there is a new book published today that I think is worth noting. The title is Good Prose: The Art of Nonfiction.  It is written by Tracy Kidder and Richard Todd and in the description of the book, the publisher makes this claim, …Good Prose—like Strunk and White’s The Elements of Style—is a succinct, authoritative, and entertaining arbiter of standards in contemporary writing, offering guidance for the professional writer and the beginner alike. This wise and useful book is the perfect companion for anyone who loves to read good books and longs to write one.Good Prose Cover

Time will tell if this volume holds up to that claim, but the sections I have read are quite good. Here are some of the statements I found particularly insightful. Some of these excerpts will also featured in an article in the Wall Street Journal’s weekend edition.

  •  To write is to talk to strangers. You want them to trust you. You might well begin by trusting them. No doubt you know some things that the reader does not —why else presume to write?—but it helps to grant that the reader has knowledge unavailable to you. This isn’t generosity; it is realism.
  • Good writing creates a dialogue between writer and reader, with the imagined reader at moments questioning, criticizing, and sometimes, you hope, assenting. What you “know” isn’t something you can pull from a shelf and deliver. What you know in prose is often what you discover in the course of writing it, as in the best of conversations with a friend—as if you and the reader do the discovering together.
  • Beginnings are an exercise in limits. You can’t make the reader love you in the first sentence or paragraph, but you can lose the reader right away. You don’t expect the doctor to cure you at once, but the doctor can surely alienate you at once, with brusqueness or bravado or indifference or confusion. There is a lot to be said for the quiet beginning.
  • Meek or bold, a good beginning achieves clarity. A sensible line threads through the prose; things follow one another with literal logic or with the logic of feeling. Clarity isn’t an exciting virtue, but it’s a virtue always, and especially at the beginning of a piece of prose. Some writers seem to resist clarity, even to write confusingly on purpose. Not many would admit to this.
  • For many other writers, clarity simply falls victim to a desire to achieve other things, to dazzle with style or to bombard with information. It’s one thing for the reader to take pleasure in the writer’s achievements, another when the writer’s own pleasure is apparent. Skill, talent, inventiveness, all can become overbearing and intrusive. The image that calls attention to itself is often the image you can do without.
  •  Sometimes the writer who overloads an opening passage is simply afraid of boring the reader. A respectable anxiety, but nothing is more boring than confusion.
  • You can’t tell it all at once. A lot of the art of beginnings is deciding what to withhold until later, or never to say at all. Take one thing at a time. Prepare your readers, tell everything they need to know in order to read on, and tell no more.

For many other writers, clarity simply falls victim to a desire to achieve other things, to dazzle with style or to bombard with information

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